Residue Prevention

The U.S. dairy industry is committed to producing safe, abundant and affordable milk and dairy beef of the highest quality. Healthy animals mean safe food, and disease prevention is the key to keeping cows healthy.

Among the measures available to treat and prevent the outbreak and spread of animal diseases among the nation’s dairy cattle, the responsible use of antibiotics has a positive impact on animal health and well-being while keeping the milk supply safe for all of us.

When dairy animals get sick and treatment is necessary, producers and veterinarians use drugs judiciously. Antibiotics should be used appropriately to prevent residues from occurring in milk or dairy beef sent to market.

For more than 25 years, the U.S. dairy industry has focused educational efforts on the judicious use of antibiotics through the annual publication of a Best Practices Manual. The 2016 edition of the National Dairy FARM Program: Farmers Assuring Responsible Management™ Milk and Dairy Beef Drug Residue Prevention Manual (published October 2015) is the primary educational tool for dairy farm managers throughout the country on the judicious and responsible use of antibiotics, including avoidance of drug residues in milk and meat.

The manual is a quick resource to review those antibiotics approved for dairy animals and can also be used as an educational tool and resource for farm managers as they develop on-farm best management practices necessary to avoid milk and meat residues. Visit the Manual and Form Library to download copies of this important tool!

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The dairy industry is committed to producing safe, abundant, and affordable milk and dairy beef of the highest quality. Healthy animals help make for safe food, and disease prevention is the key to keeping cows healthy. When dairy animals get sick and treatment is necessary, producers and veterinarians use drugs judiciously. Antibiotics should be used appropriately to prevent residues from occurring in milk or dairy beef sent to market. The marketing of milk or beef with antibiotic residues, even unintentionally, is illegal and can result in financial and criminal penalties.